Sunnah and Ḥadīth

Sunnah and Ḥadīth

Building on his articles looking at the intersection of ḥadīth and fiqh, this monograph examines conceptual differences between sunnah and ḥadīth.

 

difference between hadith and sunnah-1

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Departure of Scholars from the Way of the Ḥadīth Imāms

Departure of Scholars from the Way of the Ḥadīth Imāms

Building on his articles looking at the intersection of ḥadīth and fiqh, this monograph examines some crucial insights into ḥadīth which are required to not confuse the two enterprises. Specifically, he sees the two broad sources of attaining knowledge as being historical reports (in which you are informed of information from someone else) and intellectually derived views, termed philosophy (in which you essentially derive your own information). Ḥadīth reports fall under the former and require their own set of rules for verification, while fiqh, and most other disciplines, fall under the latter and require a different approach. In another monograph, Dr. Akram defended the school and approach of the early scholars of jurisprudence and demonstrates how their approach was later distorted and wound up being misunderstood as a result of blurring these lines. In this one, he examines mistakes made by scholars in their approach to ḥadīth.

Scholars and Way of Hadith-1

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Virtue of the Juristic Approach in Fiqh

Virtue of the Juristic Approach in Fiqh

Building on his previous articles looking at the intersection of ḥadīth and fiqh, this monograph pushes that discussion further to more forcefully delineate the boundaries of each discipline. Specifically, he sees the two broad sources of attaining knowledge as being historical reports (in which you are informed of information from someone else) and intellectually derived views, termed philosophy (in which you essentially derive your own information). Ḥadīth reports fall under the former and require their own set of rules for verification, while fiqh, and most other disciplines, fall under the latter and require a different approach. In this monograph, Dr. Akram defends the school and approach of the early scholars of jurisprudence, and demonstrates how their approach was distorted and wound up being misunderstood as a result of blurring these lines.

Virtue of Fiqh-1

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Between Ḥadīth and Fiqh

Between Ḥadīth and Fiqh

Building on his previous articles looking at the intersection of ḥadīth and fiqh, this monograph pushes that discussion further to more forcefully delineate the boundaries of each discipline. Specifically, he sees the two broad sources of attaining knowledge as being historical reports (in which you are informed of information from someone else) and intellectually derived views, termed philosophy (in which you essentially derive your own information). Ḥadīth reports fall under the former and require their own set of rules for verification, while fiqh, and most other disciplines, fall under the latter and require a different approach.

Between Hadith and Fiqh-1

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The Right Pathway to Studying Ḥadīth

The Right Pathway to Studying Ḥadīth

The right pathway to studying Prophetic ḥadīth is the subject of much debate, especially in light of the sheer volume and complexity of the ḥadīth corpus. Dr. Akram points out that there was a historical duality that occurred around the 5th Ḥijrī century, with ḥadīth being transformed from being treated as historical reports that required scrutiny to sacred texts requiring due reverence. This led to a laxity in the community which undermined sound knowledge, and continues to do so today. Continue reading

The Meaning of Ijāzah

The True Role of Ijāzah within Islamic Scholarship

The Ijāzah is a unique and cardinal feature of the Islamic tradition, arising from the earliest times to ensure a degree of protection and accuracy to the transmission of knowledge. At the same time, its usage over time varied while its exact meaning, scope and role within the Islamic sciences remains hotly contested and misunderstood from various quarters. Here, Dr. Akram, a traditional scholar par excellence, shares his valuable thoughts on this subject.

 

 

 

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Bashir Malik (March 15, 1930—July 6, 2018)

IMG_324811Everyone dies but not everyone truly lives. He was a teacher to many of us, a true mentor and educator, and a father figure to the entire community. His iconic smile and his soft demeanor, his loving support for many communities, his reconciliatory role in many conflicts, will be sorely missed.

He was born in 1930 in Sialkot, Pakistan and became a lawyer by profession. He emigrated first to the United Kingdom and then to the United States. In all of the three countries he lived, he became a pioneer in Islamic work. Ever since he met the late Shaykh Abū al-Aʿlā Mawdūdī—with whom he associated himself until the day he died in 1979—he dedicated himself to serving the cause of Islām. He was instrumental in the establishment of many of the largest Islamic centers across the tristate area. He tirelessly traveled the country for the sake of daʿwah, at a time when it was not popular to do so. He was the first to deliver English lectures on Islām in a number of college campuses. With his tafsīr books in hand, he traveled from home to home, city to city, college to college campus and halaqah to halaqah, to deliver Qurʾānic lessons and call people to the Qurʾānic way. He was a major figure in ICNA, the national organization that he loved and supported.

Communities, masājid and Imāms across America will have fond memories of him.

Let us be sad only for ourselves. As for our dear departed soul, what a fortunate life he lead, of steadfastness and consistency, until his very last days. Even days before he passed, in his last moments of consciousness, I would visit him and he had nothing but duʿāʾ on his tired lips for me, asking Allah to shower his blessings upon me and give me a good ending, with his ever fading but still iconic smile.

Let our uncle Bashir have the bashārah (glad tidings) of a good end O Allah!

إِنَّ الَّذِينَ قَالُوا رَبُّنَا اللَّـهُ ثُمَّ اسْتَقَامُوا تَتَنَزَّلُ عَلَيْهِمُ الْمَلَائِكَةُ أَلَّا تَخَافُوا وَلَا تَحْزَنُوا وَأَبْشِرُوا بِالْجَنَّةِ الَّتِي كُنتُمْ تُوعَدُونَ

Those who say “Allah is our Lord” and then remain steadfast, upon them descend angels (and say): “Do not fear nor grieve, and receive good tidings of Paradise which you were promised. [41:30]